Imaginations 4-2 | Media and Mothers' Matters

Guest Edi­tor Oluyin­ka Esan

Table of Contents

Artist Interview—Superstrumps: the Card Game with a Mis­sion | Syd Moore and Hei­di Wig­more in Con­ver­sa­tion with Oluyin­ka Esan

From Soap Opera to Real­i­ty Pro­gram­ming: Exam­in­ing Moth­er­hood, Moth­er­work and the Mater­nal Role on Pop­u­lar Tele­vi­sion | Rebec­ca Feasey

Moth­er­hood and the media under the Micro­scope: The back­lash against fem­i­nism and the Mom­my Wars | Kim Akass

Tea with Moth­er: Sarah Palin and the Dis­course of Moth­er­hood as a Polit­i­cal Ide­al | Janet McCabe

General Contribution

Adult Fear and Con­trol: Ambiva­lence and Dual­i­ty in Clive Barker’s The Thief of Always | Gabrielle Krist­jan­son


Full Issue PDF | http://​dx​.doi​.org/10.17742/IMAGE.mother.4-2


Article Abstracts

Artist Inter­view - Super­strumps: the Card Game with a Mis­sion Syd Moore and Hei­di Wig­more in Con­ver­sa­tion with Oluyin­ka Esan | Oluyin­ka Esan

The artist inter­view in this dossier is an exam­ple of col­lab­o­ra­tive work between an artist and a writer.  It is a show­case of how pop­u­lar cul­ture can be re-appro­pri­at­ed.  The inter­vie­wees are the co-cre­ators of the card game Super­strumps devel­oped to address the issue of stereo­typ­ing of women.  In the inter­view, they recount the process of cre­at­ing the game involv­ing oth­er women from their local com­mu­ni­ty.  This exem­pli­fies how a strat­e­gy for resist­ing and reclaim­ing iden­ti­ties under­mined by neg­a­tive labelling is devel­oped.   Their views are strong­ly shaped by their fem­i­nist prin­ci­ples. The inter­view acknowl­edges the com­plex nature of iden­ti­ties, the chal­lenge of media rep­re­sen­ta­tion and the sym­bi­ot­ic rela­tion­ship between media and audi­ences is revealed.

From Soap Opera to Real­i­ty Pro­gram­ming: Exam­in­ing Moth­er­hood, Moth­er­work and the Mater­nal Role on Pop­u­lar Tele­vi­sion | Rebec­ca Feasey

Rep­re­sen­ta­tions of moth­er­hood dom­i­nate the tele­vi­sion land­scape in a vari­ety of pop­u­lar genre texts, and as such it is impor­tant that we con­sid­er the ways in which these women are being con­struct­ed and cir­cu­lat­ed on the small screen. Indeed, although much work has been done to inves­ti­gate the depic­tion of women on tele­vi­sion, lit­tle research exists to account for the por­tray­al of moth­er­ing, moth­er­hood, and the mater­nal role. With this in mind, this arti­cle intro­duces extant lit­er­a­ture con­cern­ing the rep­re­sen­ta­tion of moth­er­hood in the media and then exam­ines ways in which this research might be under­stood in rela­tion to the depic­tion of moth­ers in soap opera, sit­u­a­tion com­e­dy, teen dra­ma, dram­e­dy and real­i­ty tele­vi­sion. It con­sid­ers the ways in which pop­u­lar tele­vi­sion texts form a con­sen­sus as they nego­ti­ate the ide­al­ized image of the ‘good’ moth­er in favour of a more attain­able depic­tion of ‘good enough’ moth­er­ing which stands apart from the roman­ti­cized image of the ide­al moth­er that dom­i­nates the broad­er enter­tain­ment are­na.

Moth­er­hood and the Media under the Micro­scope: The Back­lash Against Fem­i­nism and the Mom­my Wars |Kim Akass

Despite the pass­ing of sex­u­al dis­crim­i­na­tion leg­is­la­tion, the dif­fi­cul­ty of com­bin­ing work and moth­er­hood repeat­ed­ly hits the head­lines.  This paper looks at the Amer­i­can media phe­nom­e­non known as the ‘mom­my wars’ and asks if British moth­ers can expect to face the same issues and atti­tudes as their Amer­i­can sis­ters.

Tea with Moth­er: Sarah Palin and the Dis­course of Moth­er­hood as a Polit­i­cal Ide­al |Janet McCabe

Sel­dom has some­one emerged so unex­pect­ed­ly and sen­sa­tion­al­ly on to the Amer­i­can polit­i­cal scene as Sarah Palin.  With Palin came what had rarely, if ever, been seen before on a pres­i­den­tial trail: hock­ey moms, Cari­bou-hunt­ing, pit­bulls in lip­stick par­celled as polit­i­cal weapon­ry. And let’s not for­get those five chil­dren, includ­ing Track 19, set to deploy to Iraq, Bris­tol, and her unplanned preg­nan­cy at 17, and Trig, a six-month-old infant with Down’s syn­drome.  Nev­er before had moth­er­hood been so fine­ly bal­anced with US pres­i­den­tial pol­i­tics. Bio­log­i­cal vigour trans­lat­ed into polit­i­cal ener­gy, moth­er­hood trans­formed into an intox­i­cat­ing polit­i­cal ide­al. This arti­cle focus­es on Sarah Palin and how her brand of “rugged Alaskan moth­er­hood” (Pun­dit­Mom 2008) became cen­tral to her media image, as well as what this rep­re­sen­ta­tion has to tell us about the rela­tion­ship between moth­er­ing as a polit­i­cal ide­al, US pol­i­tics, and the media.

Adult Fear and Con­trol: Ambiva­lence and Dual­i­ty in Clive Barker’s The Thief of Always | Gabrielle Krist­jan­son

This arti­cle con­sid­ers the rela­tion­ship between the text and accom­pa­ny­ing illus­tra­tions in Clive Barker’s children's nov­el The Thief of Always: A Fable. This tale of abduc­tion was pub­lished in the social back­ground of fear around the child preda­tor of the ear­ly 1990s and incor­po­rates ideas of mon­strous vil­lainy, loss of child­hood inno­cence, and insa­tiable desires.  As a fable, Thief is a cau­tion­ary tale that not only teach­es that child­hood years are pre­cious and are not to be wished away or squan­dered in idle leisure, but also of the dan­gers that some adults pose to chil­dren. Prob­lem­at­i­cal­ly, an hon­est and frank dis­cus­sion of adult sex­u­al desires toward chil­dren would despoil the very inno­cence that is try­ing to be pro­tect­ed; thus, a les­son such as this must be sub­li­mat­ed with­in the sto­ry. Yet, it is the illus­tra­tions, and more specif­i­cal­ly the way in which the illus­tra­tions cor­rob­o­rate and con­tra­dict the plot of this sto­ry that reveals an under­ly­ing ambiva­lence toward the fig­ure of the child and an echo­ing dual­i­ty present in both the child and the child preda­tor.

About the Contributors

Akass, Kim is a lec­tur­er in Film and TV at the Uni­ver­si­ty of Hert­ford­shire.  She has co-edit­ed and con­tributed to Read­ing Sex and the City (IB Tau­ris, 2004), Read­ing Six Feet Under: TV To Die For (IB Tau­ris, 2005), Read­ing The L Word: Out­ing Con­tem­po­rary Tele­vi­sion (IB Tau­ris, 2006), Read­ing Des­per­ate House­wives: Beyond the White Pick­et Fence (IB Tau­ris, 2006) and Qual­i­ty TV: Con­tem­po­rary Amer­i­can TV and Beyond (IB Tau­ris, 2007).  She is cur­rent­ly research­ing the rep­re­sen­ta­tion of moth­er­hood in the media and is one of the found­ing edi­tors of the tele­vi­sion jour­nal Crit­i­cal Stud­ies in Tele­vi­sion: The Inter­na­tion­al Jour­nal of Tele­vi­sion Stud­ies (MUP), man­ag­ing edi­tor of CSTon­line as well as (with McCabe) series edi­tor of the ‘Read­ing Con­tem­po­rary Tele­vi­sion’ for IB Tau­ris.  Their new col­lec­tion TV’s Bet­ty Goes Glob­al: From Telen­ov­ela to Inter­na­tion­al Brand was pub­lished last year.

Esan, Oluyin­ka is a Read­er in the School of Film and Media at the Uni­ver­si­ty of Win­ches­ter UK.   Her research focus­es on media pro­duc­tion prac­tices and recep­tion of media mes­sages espe­cial­ly by women and chil­dren.  This is informed by her inter­est in social rel­e­vance of media mes­sages and their impact on soci­ety.  Through her empir­i­cal stud­ies in non-West­ern con­texts, Oluyin­ka offers fresh per­spec­tives which enrich con­cep­tu­al­i­sa­tions of media and film prac­tices. Her recent works offer insight into audi­ence plea­sures and the valu­ing of films (Nol­ly­wood).  She is the author of Niger­ian Tele­vi­sion, Fifty Years of Tele­vi­sion in Africa (AMV Pub­lish­ers Prince­ton NJ, 2009).   Her cur­rent project is Watch­ing Tele­vi­sion: What Niger­ian Chil­dren Want. Dr Esan con­vened the round­table event on Media and Moth­ers’ Mat­ters (Octo­ber 2011) at which ear­li­er ver­sions of papers in this dossier were first pre­sent­ed.

Feasey, Rebec­ca is Senior Lec­tur­er in Film and Media Com­mu­ni­ca­tions at Bath Spa Uni­ver­si­ty. She has pub­lished a range of work on celebri­ty cul­ture, con­tem­po­rary Hol­ly­wood star­dom and the rep­re­sen­ta­tion of gen­der in pop­u­lar media cul­ture. She has pub­lished in jour­nals such as the Quar­ter­ly Review of Film and Video, the Jour­nal of Pop­u­lar Film and Tele­vi­sion, the Jour­nal of Gen­der Stud­ies, Con­tin­u­um: Jour­nal of Media & Cul­tur­al Stud­ies and the Euro­pean Jour­nal of Cul­tur­al Stud­ies. She has writ­ten book length stud­ies on mas­culin­i­ty and pop­u­lar tele­vi­sion (EUP, 2008) and moth­er­hood on the small screen (Anthem, 2012). She is cur­rent­ly writ­ing a research mono­graph on mater­nal read­ings of moth­er­hood on tele­vi­sion (Peter Lang, 2015).

Krist­jan­son, Gabrielle is a PhD can­di­date in the School of Cul­ture and Com­mu­ni­ca­tion at the Uni­ver­si­ty of Mel­bourne, Aus­tralia. She holds a Bach­e­lor of Sci­ence and a Mas­ter of Arts in Com­par­a­tive Lit­er­a­ture, both obtained at the Uni­ver­si­ty of Alber­ta, Cana­da. Her research revolves around the man­i­fes­ta­tion of moral pan­ic and crim­i­nal mon­stros­i­ty in West­ern lit­er­a­ture, and her dis­ser­ta­tion is on fic­tion­al rep­re­sen­ta­tions of the child preda­tor in adult and children's lit­er­a­ture.

McCabe, Janet is Lec­tur­er in Film, Tele­vi­sion and Cre­ative Indus­tries at Birk­beck, Uni­ver­si­ty of Lon­don. She edits Crit­i­cal Stud­ies in Tele­vi­sion and has writ­ten wide­ly on fem­i­nism, cul­tur­al mem­o­ry / pol­i­tics and tele­vi­sion. She co-edit­ed sev­er­al col­lec­tions, includ­ing Qual­i­ty TV: Con­tem­po­rary Amer­i­can TV and Beyond (2007) and Read­ing Sex and the City (2004), and her lat­est works include The West Wing (2012) and TV’s Bet­ty Goes Glob­al: From Telen­ov­ela to Inter­na­tion­al Brand (2012; co-edit­ed with Kim Akass).

Moore, Syd is the author of The Drown­ing Pool and Witch Hunt, nov­els which explore Essex witch hunts.  She is cur­rent­ly work­ing on her third book, The Sac­ri­fice.  Before embark­ing on a career in edu­ca­tion, Syd worked exten­sive­ly in the pub­lish­ing indus­try, fronting Chan­nel 4’s book pro­gramme, Pulp.  She was the found­ing edi­tor of Lev­el 4, an arts and cul­ture mag­a­zine, and is co-cre­ator of Super­strumps, the game that reclaims female stereo­types. When she is not writ­ing Syd works for Met­al Cul­ture, an arts organ­i­sa­tion, pro­mot­ing arts and cul­tur­al events and devel­op­ing lit­er­a­ture pro­grammes.

Wig­more, Hei­di is a visu­al artist and fine art lec­tur­er. She stud­ied at Nor­wich School of Art and com­plet­ed an MA at the Uni­ver­si­ty of East Lon­don in 2001. Her prac­tice is draw­ing based but mul­ti­dis­ci­pli­nary, incor­po­rat­ing instal­la­tion, props and film. Her imagery is overt­ly fig­u­ra­tive but dis­lo­cat­ed, she is inter­est­ed in the (imper­fect) imi­ta­tion of the human: the doll/mannequin/dummy, the human sim­u­lacrum.  Heidi’s pub­lic art projects include a tem­po­rary bill­board art­work in cen­tral Lon­don, 'Inde­pen­dent Free State', that explored the female form as map/territory and cus­tomized beach huts at The South Bank Cen­tre for the Fes­ti­val of Britain in 2011. She has lec­tured for Uni­ver­si­ty of Essex and Anglia Ruskin Uni­ver­si­ty. She cur­rent­ly runs work­shops with Eng­lish Nation­al Bal­let and is an artis­tic asses­sor for Arts Coun­cil Eng­land.

Résumés des articles

Artist Inter­view - Super­strumps: the Card Game with a Mis­sion Syd Moore and Hei­di Wig­more in Con­ver­sa­tion with Oluyin­ka Esan | Oluyin­ka Esan

L’entretien dans ce dossier illus­tre bien le poten­tiel des col­lab­o­ra­tions entre artistes et écrivains. On y voit com­ment la cul­ture pop­u­laire peut être réap­pro­priée. Les par­tic­i­pants ont créé ensem­ble le jeu de cartes Super­strumps afin d’aborder la ques­tion des stéréo­types sur les femmes. Dans l’entretien ils revi­en­nent sur le proces­sus de créa­tion du jeu dans lequel des femmes de leur com­mu­nauté locale se sont impliquées, et à tra­vers lequel a été mis en place une stratégie de réap­pro­pri­a­tion des iden­tités déval­uées par des représen­ta­tions néga­tives. Leur point de vue est forte­ment influ­encé par leur principes fémin­istes. L’entretien tient compte de la nature mul­ti­ple des iden­tités et du défi posé par les représen­ta­tions médi­a­tiques ; au bout du compte c’est la rela­tion sym­bi­o­tique entre les média et leurs audi­ences qui émerge.

From Soap Opera to Real­i­ty Pro­gram­ming: Exam­in­ing Moth­er­hood, Moth­er­work and the Mater­nal Role on Pop­u­lar Tele­vi­sion | Rebec­ca Feasey

Les représen­ta­tions de la mater­nité pul­lu­lent sous dif­férentes formes génériques dans le paysage télévi­suel; il est impor­tant d’examiner leur con­struc­tion et leur cir­cu­la­tion sur leur petit écran. En dépit d’une lit­téra­ture fort chargée s’intéressant à la représen­ta­tion des femmes à la télévi­sion, il existe peu de travaux sur la mise en scène corol­laire de la mater­nité. Cet arti­cle retrace dans un pre­mier temps les travaux exis­tants, puis explore les appli­ca­tions pos­si­bles de ces recherch­es quant à la représen­ta­tion des mères dans les soap-opera, les comédies de sit­u­a­tion, les séries pour ado­les­cents, les comédies dra­ma­tiques, et la télé-réal­ité. On y voit émerg­er les façons dont un con­sen­sus se forme dans le paysage télévi­suel alors que chaque représen­ta­tion cherche à négoci­er la dif­férence entre une mater­nité idéale, et une « mater­nité accept­able » qui pour sa part se dis­tancierait de la per­fec­tion inat­teignable prônée dans le domaine plus vaste du spec­ta­cle en général.

Moth­er­hood and the Media under the Micro­scope: The Back­lash Against Fem­i­nism the Mom­my Wars |Kim Akass

Mal­gré les lég­is­la­tions con­tre la dis­crim­i­na­tion des sex­es qui s’accumulent, la dif­fi­culté d’harmoniser mater­nité et occu­pa­tions pro­fes­sion­nelles n’en occupe pas moins le haut du pavé et con­tin­ue de faire actu­al­ité. Cet arti­cle exam­ine le phénomène médi­a­tique améri­cain con­nu sous le nom de « mom­my wars » et s’interroge sur la dis­tinc­tion entre les défis de la mater­nité en Angleterre et aux États-Unis.

Tea with Moth­er: Sarah Palin and the Dis­course of Moth­er­hood as a Polit­i­cal Ide­al |Janet McCabe

Très peu d’individus ont fait une appari­tion aus­si inat­ten­due et spec­tac­u­laire que celle de Sarah Palin sur la scène poli­tique améri­caine. Avec elle ont sur­gi des traits inédits dans une cam­pagnes prési­den­tielle : ceux de la hock­ey mom, de la chas­se au cari­bou, de la femme pugnace mais fardée util­isés comme des argu­ments par­ti­sans. Cela sans oubli­er les enfants Palin mis à con­tri­bu­tion : Track, 19 ans, atten­dant son affec­ta­tion mil­i­taire en Irak, Bris­tol, fille-mère à 17 ans, et Trig, un bébé tri­somique de six mois. Une image si ori­en­tée de la mater­nité n’avait jamais aupar­a­vant été impliquée dans une cam­pagne poli­tique aux États-Unis. La vigueur géné­tique s’y est vue trans­for­mée en énergie poli­tique, et la mater­nité en un idéal poli­tique intox­i­cant. Cet arti­cle se con­cen­tre sur la façon dont l’image d’une « rugged Alaskan moth­er­hood » (Pun­dit­Mon 2008) est dev­enue si cru­ciale dans la per­son­nal­ité médi­a­tique de Sarah Palin, et sur ce qu’une telle image peut nous appren­dre quant aux rela­tions entre la mater­nité comme idéal, la poli­tique améri­caine, et les média.

Adult Fear and Con­trol: Ambiva­lence and Dual­i­ty in Clive Barker’s The Thief of Always | Gabrielle Krist­jan­son

Cet arti­cle analyse le rap­port entre le texte et les illus­tra­tions dans le livre pour enfants de Clive Bark­er inti­t­ulé The Thief of Always: A Fable. Bark­er a écrit cette his­toire d’enlèvement dans le con­texte social de la peur du pré­da­teur d’enfants au début des années 90. Il y a mis en scène les idées d’un méchant mon­strueux, de la perte de l’innocence enfan­tine, et des désirs insa­tiables. En tant que fable, le livre est un con­te de mise en garde, qui non seule­ment enseigne que l’enfance est pré­cieuse, étant néces­saire pour chaque enfant qui ne doit pas la gaspiller paresseuse­ment, mais aus­si qu’il existe un dan­ger que cer­tains adultes peu­vent pos­er face aux enfants. Une réflex­ion sincère sur les désirs sex­uels adultes face aux enfants étant prob­lé­ma­tique parce qu’elle dépouille l’innocence qu’on cherche à pro­téger. Bark­er a donc dû sub­limer une telle leçon dans le réc­it. Ce sont alors les illus­tra­tions et leur rap­port au réc­it à la fois cor­rob­o­rant et con­trac­t­if qui révè­lent une ambiva­lence cachée du per­son­nage enfant, ain­si qu’une dual­ité présente dans les deux per­son­nages : l’enfant et le pré­da­teur d’enfants.

À propos des contributeurs

Akass, Kim est lec­tur­er en études ciné­matographiques et télévi­suelles à l’Université de Hert­ford­shire. Elle a coédité et con­tribué aux ouvrages col­lec­tifs Read­ing Sex and the City (IB Tau­ris, 2004), Read­ing Six Feet Under: TV To Die For (IB Tau­ris, 2005), Read­ing The L Word: Out­ing Con­tem­po­rary Tele­vi­sion (IB Tau­ris, 2006), Read­ing Des­per­ate House­wives: Beyond the White Pick­et Fence (IB Tau­ris, 2006), et Qual­i­ty TV: Con­tem­po­rary Amer­i­can TV and Beyond (IB Tau­ris, 2007). Elle mène actuelle­ment des recherch­es sur la représen­ta­tion de la mater­nité dans les média. Elle est co-fon­da­trice de la revue d’études télévi­suelles Crit­i­cal Stud­ies in Tele­vi­sion: The Inter­na­tion­al Jour­nal of Tele­vi­sion Stud­ies (MUP), éditrice exéc­u­tive de CSTon­line, et éditrice asso­ciée de la série « Read­ing Con­tem­po­rary Tele­vi­sion » chez IB Tau­ris dont le plus récent ouvrage TV’s Bet­ty Goes Glob­al: From Telen­ov­ela to Inter­na­tion­al Brand est paru en 2012.

Esan, Oluyin­ka est read­er à la School of Film and Media de l’Université de Win­ches­ter, UK. Elle mène des recherch­es sur les pra­tiques de pro­duc­tion médi­a­tique et la récep­tion des mes­sages médi­a­tiques, en par­ti­c­uli­er chez les femmes et les enfants. Ces travaux s’inscrivent dans le cadre plus large de ses intérêts pour la per­ti­nence et l’impact soci­aux des mes­sages médi­a­tiques. À tra­vers ses travaux empiriques en con­textes non occi­den­taux, Oluyin­ka sug­gère des per­spec­tives neuves à même d’enrichir nos con­cep­tions des pra­tiques médi­a­tiques et filmiques. Ses travaux les plus récents exam­ine la notion de plaisir spec­ta­teur en lien avec dif­férents échelles de mise en valeur des pra­tiques ciné­matographiques (Noly­wood). Elle est l’auteure de Niger­ian Tele­vi­sion, Fifty Years of Tele­vi­sion in Africa (AMV Pub­lish­ers Prince­ton NJ, 2009). Elle tra­vaille actuelle­ment à l’écriture d’un nou­veau livre inti­t­ulé Watch­ing Tele­vi­sion: What Niger­ian Chil­dren Want. Elle a organ­ise la table-ronde « Media and Moth­ers’ Mat­ters » (Octo­bre 2011) dans laque­lle ont été présen­tées les pre­mières ver­sions des arti­cles du présent dossier.

Feasey, Rebec­ca est senior lec­tur­er en com­mu­ni­ca­tions, ciné­ma, et média à l’Université de Bath Spa. Elle a fait paraître de nom­breux textes sur la cul­ture de la célébrité, le star-sys­tem hol­ly­woo­d­i­en con­tem­po­rain, et la représen­ta­tion des sex­es dans la cul­ture médi­a­tique pop­u­laire. Elle a pub­lié dans des revues comme le Quar­ter­ly Review of Film and Video, le Jour­nal of Pop­u­lar Film and Tele­vi­sion, le Jour­nal of Gen­der Stud­ies, Con­tin­u­um: Jour­nal of Media & Cul­tur­al Stud­ies et le Euro­pean Jour­nal of Cul­tur­al Stud­ies. Elle est d’autre part auteure d’études appro­fondies sur la mas­culin­ité et la cul­ture télévi­suelle pop­u­laire (EUP, 2008), ain­si que la mater­nité au petit écran (Anthem, 2012). Elle rédi­ge actuelle­ment une mono­gra­phie sur les inter­pré­ta­tions par des mères de la mater­nité télévi­suelle (à paraître chez Peter Lang, 2015).

Krist­jan­son, Gabrielle : est doc­tor­ante à l’Université de Mel­bourne en Aus­tralie (à l’école de la cul­ture et de la com­mu­ni­ca­tion). Elle est tit­u­laire d’un bac­calau­réat ès sci­ences et d’une maîtrise ès arts de l’Université de l’Alberta au Cana­da. Elle mène des recherch­es dans les domaines de la man­i­fes­ta­tion de la panique morale et de la mon­stru­osité crim­inelle dans la lit­téra­ture occi­den­tale. Sa thèse se con­cen­tre sur les représen­ta­tions fic­tives du pré­da­teur d’enfants dans la lit­téra­ture adulte et de jeunesse.

McCabe, Janet est lec­tur­er en études des films, de la télévi­sion, et des indus­tries de la créa­tion à l’Université Birk­beck de Lon­dres. Elle est éditrice de Crit­i­cal Stud­ies in Tele­vi­sion et a écrit sur le fémin­isme, la mémoire cul­turelle et poli­tique de la télévi­sion. Elle a coédité plusieurs ouvrages col­lec­tifs, dont Qual­i­ty TV: Con­tem­po­rary Amer­i­can TV and Beyond (2007) et Read­ing Sex and the City (2004). Ses plus récents travaux sont The West Wing (2012) et TV’s Bet­ty Goes Glob­al: From Telen­ov­ela to Inter­na­tion­al Brand (2012; avec Kim Akass).

Moore, Syd est l’auteure de The Drown­ing Pool et de Witch Hunt, deux romans qui cen­trés sur les chas­s­es aux sor­cières d’Essex. Elle tra­vaille actuelle­ment à son troisième livre, inti­t­ulé The Sac­ri­fice. Avant d’entamer une car­rière en édu­ca­tion, elle a œuvré longue­ment dans le monde de l’édition, en dirigeant notam­ment l’émission sur la lit­téra­ture de Chan­nel 4 : « Pulp ». Elle est fon­da­trice du défunt mag­a­zine sur l’art et la cul­ture Lev­el 4, et co-créa­trice de Super­strumps, un jeu axé sur la réap­pro­pri­a­tion des stéréo­types de la féminité. Quand elle n’écrit pas, Syd œuvre auprès de Met­al Cul­ture, un organ­isme pour la pro­mo­tion d’événements cul­turels et artis­tiques et le développe­ment de pro­grammes en lit­téra­ture.

Wig­more, Hei­di est artiste visuelle et lec­tur­er en Beaux-Arts. Elle a étudié à la Nor­wich School of Arts et obtenu une maîtrise de la Uni­ver­si­ty of East Lon­don en 2001. Ses travaux sont basés sur le dessin mais demeurent mul­ti­dis­ci­plinaires en incor­po­rant l’installation, ain­si que des acces­soires et des extraits filmiques. Son imagerie est à la fois fig­u­ra­tive et dis­lo­quée, et elle s’intéresse aux imi­ta­tions tou­jours for­cé­ment impar­faites de la fig­ure humaine telles que la poupée, le man­nequin et le pan­tin. Par­mi ses pro­jets publics on trou­ve notam­ment « Inde­pen­dant Free State », un détourne­ment tem­po­raire de pan­neau pub­lic­i­taire au cœur de Lon­dres qui explo­rait la forme fémi­nine en tant que carte/territoire, ain­si qu’une série de cab­ines de plage trans­for­mées au South Bank Cen­tre pour l’édition 2011 du Fes­ti­val of Britain. Elle a été lec­tur­er à l’Université de Essex et à la Angela Ruskin Uni­ver­si­ty. Elle dirige actuelle­ment des ate­liers en col­lab­o­ra­tion avec le Eng­lish Nation­al Bal­let, et occupe la posi­tion d’évaluatrice artis­tique pour le Arts Coun­cil Eng­land.