Imaginations 5-1 | Perceived Peripherality and Places Images: The City, the Region, the Border | Table of Contents

Guest Edi­tor Susan Ingram

Intro­duc­tion

Kanak Imag­i­nar­ies: A Sense of Place in the Work of Déwé Görödé | Ray­lene Ram­say

A Place to Stand: Land and Water in Māori Film | Deb­o­rah Walk­er-Mor­ri­son

Black Wool and Vin­tage Shoes: The Welling­ton Look | Felic­i­ty Per­ry

Imag­in­ing Place: An Empir­i­cal Study of How Cul­tur­al Out­siders and Insid­ers Receive Fic­tion­al Rep­re­sen­ta­tions of Place in Caryl Férey’s Utu | Ellen Carter

NZ@Frankfurt: Imag­in­ing New Zealand’s Guest of Hon­our Pre­sen­ta­tion at the 2012 Frank­furt Book Fair from the Point of View of Lit­er­ary Trans­la­tion | Angela Kölling

Film­stadt in the Vorstadt: Loca­tion­al­i­ty in the Film­mak­ing Prac­tice of Mihály/ Michael Kertész/ Cur­tiz | Susan Ingram

High-Rise Zhiva­go | Ele­na Siemens

It’s a Kind of Mag­ic: Sit­u­at­ing Nos­tal­gia for Tech­no­log­i­cal Progress and the Occult in Guy Ritchie's Sher­lock Holmes | Markus Reisen­leit­ner

Guest Artist—Katrina Sark

Port­fo­lio

clas­sic café | green­ery parks | reusing revi­sion­ing | bor­der con­nec­tions else­where | bor­der con­nec­tions with­in

Les espaces urbains, la vie quo­ti­di­enne, et l’oeil de l’histoireEntre­vue avec Kat­ri­na Sark | Mar­tin Par­rot

Urban Spaces, Every­day Life and the Eye of His­to­ryAn Inter­view with Kat­ri­na Sark | Mar­tin Par­rot


Full Issue PDF | http://​dx​.doi​.org/10.17742/IMAGE.periph.5-1


Arti­cle Abstracts

Kanak Imag­i­nar­ies: A Sense of Place in the Work of Déwé Görödé | Ray­lene Ram­say

The study of the Kanak imag­i­nary in the work of the first pub­lished Kanak (indige­nous) New Cale­don­ian writer shows this to be per­me­at­ed by a sense of place. Root­ed­ness in, and intense com­mu­ni­ty with the land is not incom­pat­i­ble with the flu­id­i­ty of ances­tral criss-cross­ing of the Pacif­ic or of con­stant bor­der-cross­ing (path­ways of exchange between groups) but nonethe­less remains cen­tral. The ‘hin­ter­land’ con­sti­tut­ed by the places of the tribu (cus­tom­ary lands) sets up a chal­lenge to the dom­i­nance of Nouméa la blanche and Déwé Görödé’s artic­u­la­tion of places of iden­ti­ty re-nego­ti­ate the urban/regional or Noumea/Bush/Tribu nexus to coun­ter­bal­ance or con­test nation­al (French) imag­i­nar­ies. Yet Görödé's work presents both a return to a Kanak Place to Stand and a crit­i­cal self in process (the lat­ter sit­u­at­ed in a ‘no man’s land’). The places in her work are ulti­mate­ly ‘cog­ni­tive­ly dis­so­nant’: the mar­gin­al or hin­ter-land of Kanak imag­i­nar­ies (the tribu), can hold (to) their own both out­side and inside the city yet also open them­selves up inter­nal­ly to mul­ti­plic­i­ty and cri­tique.

A Place to Stand: Land and Water in Māori Film | Deb­o­rah Walk­er-Mor­ri­son

New Zealand (NZ) Māori iden­ti­ty, as is the case for indige­nous peo­ples the world over, is inex­tri­ca­bly linked to a sense of place of ori­gin, Tūran­gawae­wae, lit­er­al­ly, “a place to stand one’s feet”. Place here is obvi­ous­ly first and fore­most about Land, but also includes the rivers, lakes and sea that have sus­tained Māori com­mu­ni­ties since their arrival in Aotearoa, almost a thou­sand years ago. Link­ing rep­re­sen­ta­tions of Land and Water to a re-read­ing of Paul Gilroy’s twin metaphors of Roots and Routes, this paper reads issues of loss, con­ser­va­tion, regain­ing and/or trans­for­ma­tion of such a sense of place as cen­tral to Māori fic­tion film.

Black Wool and Vin­tage Shoes: The Welling­ton Look | Felic­i­ty Per­ry

He told me I didn’t look like I was from Welling­ton”, a friend, from a small town almost two hours away, con­fid­ed to me over a cock­tail in a down­town bar. This arti­cle asks, what is the Welling­ton look that this state­ment describes? How does it pro­duce and reflect Wellington’s rep­u­ta­tion as the locus of arts and pol­i­tics in Aotearoa/New Zealand? It exam­ines how the inhab­i­tants of Welling­ton weave the fab­ric of the city togeth­er through their dress, ana­lyz­ing how Welling­ton-based media, bou­tiques, design­ers, and locals togeth­er cre­ate a style that is dis­tinc­tive­ly ‘Welling­ton’.

Imag­in­ing Place: An Empir­i­cal Study of How Cul­tur­al Out­siders and Insid­ers Receive Fic­tion­al Rep­re­sen­ta­tions of Place in Caryl Férey’s Utu | Ellen Carter

I pro­vide empir­i­cal evi­dence from a lon­gi­tu­di­nal cross-cul­tur­al read­er recep­tion sur­vey show­ing that cul­tur­al out­sider (French) and insid­er (New Zealand) read­ers are dif­fer­ent­ly influ­enced by the geo­graph­i­cal­ly and cul­tur­al­ly-sit­u­at­ed ele­ments in Utu (French 2004, Eng­lish trans­la­tion 2011), a crime nov­el set in con­tem­po­rary New Zealand by French writer Caryl Férey. After read­ing the nov­el, both cul­tur­al out­sider and insid­er read­ers changed their opin­ions towards the image por­trayed by Férey, even when his cul­tur­al claims were incor­rect. Fur­ther­more, for French read­ers, this influ­ence extend­ed beyond Utu’s final page to opin­ions about New Zealand and its inhab­i­tants.

NZ@Frankfurt: Imag­in­ing New Zealand’s Guest of Hon­our Pre­sen­ta­tion at the 2012 Frank­furt Book Fair from the Point of View of Lit­er­ary Trans­la­tion | Angela Kölling

With over 7,000 exhibitors from over 100 coun­tries and cir­ca 300,000 vis­i­tors each year the Frank­furt Book Fair is a play­ground for polit­i­cal, eco­nom­ic, and cul­tur­al imag­in­ings, includ­ing many domes­tic and for­eign places. The Book Fair is often con­ceived of and stud­ied as a site of inter­cul­tur­al pol­i­tics and com­merce but has not yet ful­ly been explored as a site of trans­la­tion and translator’s agency. This arti­cle offers crit­i­cal reflec­tions on metaphors for the trans­la­tor, argu­ing that a shift of the base metaphor in com­par­a­tive lit­er­a­ture stud­ies of trans­la­tion from con­flict to fric­tion could redi­rect inter­dis­ci­pli­nary trans­la­tion stud­ies. I pro­pose that the fric­tion metaphor leads toward an appro­pri­ate bal­ance between com­plex detail and order­ing reduc­tion of data that allows us to describe the inten­si­ty and the chal­lenges of trans­la­tion with­out recre­at­ing the old-estab­lished real­i­ties we already know.

Film­stadt in the Vorstadt: Loca­tion­al­i­ty in the Film­mak­ing Prac­tice of Mihály/ Michael Kertész/ Cur­tiz | Susan Ingram

The arti­cle exam­ines the largest and most mon­u­men­tal of the silent film epics pro­duced in the Aus­tri­an repub­lic: Sodom und Gom­or­rha (1922). In seek­ing out the film’s shoot­ing loca­tion, an aban­doned site of clay pits and hilly grass­lands at the south­ern edge of Vien­na, the arti­cle explores what the site’s his­to­ry and cur­rent incar­na­tion as part of a Kur­park reveal about the filmmaker’s urban imag­i­nary and the role of tech­nol­o­gy in mod­ern­iz­ing it, and it estab­lish­es par­al­lels between the ear­ly work he did under the name Michael Kertész and the lat­er suc­cess of his cult clas­sic Casablan­ca.

High-Rise Zhiva­go | Ele­na Siemens

This arti­cle dis­cuss­es the Tagan­ka Theatre’s pro­duc­tion of Pasternak’s Doc­tor Zhiva­go, staged in a remote Moscow sub­urb. Per­formed in a Sovi­et-built palace of cul­ture, the show rad­i­cal­ly rein­ter­prets Zhiva­go, trans­form­ing it from an intense­ly per­son­al to a col­lec­tive nar­ra­tive. Draw­ing on a chap­ter from my book The­atre in Pass­ing: A Moscow Pho­to-Diary (Intel­lect 2011), the paper refers to Mar­vin Carl­son, who argues that the­atre build­ings and their loca­tions great­ly impact the over­all mean­ing of a show. Cit­ing evi­dence pro­vid­ed by cul­tur­al the­o­rists, archi­tec­tur­al crit­ics, as well as authors and artists, I expand on my ear­li­er dis­cus­sion of suburbs—a fer­tile sub­ject attract­ing a wealth of con­tra­dic­to­ry opin­ions. I illus­trate my dis­cus­sion with images of high-ris­es inspired by the avant-garde pho­tog­ra­ph­er Alexan­der Rod­chenko, and pic­tures of soup cans and cas­es of Coca-Cola—my trib­ute to Andy Warhol, who, like Rod­chenko, reject­ed the old in favour of the new. I con­clude with a nos­tal­gic shot of a sin­gle-fam­i­ly dwelling, rem­i­nis­cent of the spaces depict­ed in Paster­nak.

It’s a Kind of Mag­ic: Sit­u­at­ing Nos­tal­gia for Tech­no­log­i­cal Progress and the Occult in Guy Ritchie's Sher­lock Holmes | Markus Reisen­leit­ner

Guy Ritchie’s recent block­buster suc­cess with a revi­sion­ist Sher­lock Holmes is the lat­est in a series of pop­u­lar films and fic­tion to have rein­vig­o­rat­ed a nos­tal­gic imag­i­nary of London’s past that places the for­mer cap­i­tal of the Empire at the cross­roads of a per­sis­tent manichean bat­tle between empiri­cist-dri­ven tech­no­log­i­cal progress and tra­di­tions of occult knowl­edge sup­pos­ed­ly sub­merged in the 17th cen­tu­ry yet con­tin­u­ing to trick­le into the heart of the Empire from its colonies. By trac­ing some of these his­tor­i­cal lay­ers sed­i­ment­ed into 21st-cen­tu­ry pop­u­lar imag­i­nar­ies of London’s past, this arti­cle explores the mech­a­nisms of pop­u­lar culture’s pro­duc­tion of nos­tal­gia that medi­ate pub­lic mem­o­ries and his­to­ries and suture them to the imag­i­nary urban geo­gra­phies that con­sti­tute the space of the glob­al city through its metonymic sites and its mate­ri­al­ized his­to­ries.

About the Con­trib­u­tors

Ellen Carter is a PhD stu­dent joint­ly enrolled at the Uni­ver­si­ty of Auck­land, New Zealand, and the École des Hautes Études en Sci­ences Sociales, Paris, France. Her research cen­tres on how cul­tur­al out­siders write, trans­late and read cross-cul­tur­al crime fic­tion.

Susan Ingram is Asso­ciate Pro­fes­sor in the Depart­ment of Human­i­ties at York Uni­ver­si­ty, Toron­to, where she is affil­i­at­ed with the Cana­di­an Cen­tre for Ger­man and Euro­pean Stud­ies and the Research Group on Trans­la­tion and Tran­scul­tur­al Con­tact. She is the gen­er­al edi­tor of Intel­lect Book’s Urban Chic series and the edi­tor of the World Film Loca­tions vol­ume on Berlin.

Angela Kölling is a Post­doc at the Cen­tre for Euro­pean Research at Gothen­burg Uni­ver­si­ty in Swe­den. She received her PhD in Com­par­a­tive Lit­er­a­ture from the Uni­ver­si­ty of Auck­land and pub­lished her work on cre­ative non­fic­tion in post-1989 France and Ger­many as a book enti­tled Writ­ing on the Loose (Wei­dler Berlin) in 2012. Cur­rent­ly, her research focus­es on the role and (self-)positioning of lit­er­ary trans­la­tors in inter­cul­tur­al coop­er­a­tive sys­tems, such as focus coun­try pre­sen­ta­tions at inter­na­tion­al book fairs. She inves­ti­gates, in par­tic­u­lar, how metaphors fil­ter the per­cep­tion of the work-life sit­u­a­tions and the poten­tial action radius of trans­la­tors both from the point of view of prac­ti­tion­ers and researchers.

Mar­tin Par­rot is a doc­u­men­tary film­mak­er, a PhD stu­dent in Human­i­ties at York Uni­ver­si­ty, and blogger/cultural cri­tique at mon​limoilou​.com.

Felic­i­ty Per­ry is author of a doc­tor­al the­sis exam­in­ing the rela­tion­ship between dress, iden­ti­ty and the media. It explored how stu­dents at an urban non-uni­formed sec­ondary school in Aotearoa/New Zealand use dress—and dress-relat­ed discourses—to both con­struct and express their iden­ti­ty. Perry’s con­tin­u­ing research is based on an inter­est in the rela­tion­ship between media and the work­ings of every­day life, exam­in­ing the ways in which gen­der, sex­u­al­i­ty, race, class, and appear­ance inter­sect in social inter­ac­tions. Per­ry is cur­rent­ly liv­ing in Tel Aviv, enjoy­ing the oppor­tu­ni­ties for dress analy­sis avail­able in this diverse city.

Ray­lene Ram­say is Pro­fes­sor of French at the Uni­ver­si­ty of Auck­land. She has pub­lished a trans­la­tion of the first nov­el (The Wreck, Lit­tle island Press) and the poems of the Kanak woman writer, Déwé Görödé with Deb­o­rah Walk­er-Mor­ri­son (Shar­ing as Cus­tom Pro­vides, Pan­danus Press) and edit­ed and co-authored Nights of Sto­ry­telling. A Cul­tur­al His­to­ry of Kanaky/New Cale­do­nia (Uni­ver­si­ty of Hawaii Press). A study of hybrid­i­ty in the lit­er­a­tures of the French Pacif­ic is forth­com­ing with Liv­er­pool Uni­ver­si­ty Press in 2014. She has also pub­lished books on French Women in Pol­i­tics, Writ­ing Pow­er, Pater­nal Legit­imiza­tion and Mater­nal Lega­cies (Berghahn Press) and on ‘aut­ofic­tion’ (The French New Auto­bi­ogra­phies) and the French new nov­el (Robbe-Gril­let and Moder­ni­ty, Sci­ence, Sex­u­al­i­ty, and Sub­ver­sion, Uni­ver­si­ty Press of Flori­da).

Markus Reisen­leit­ner is Asso­ciate Pro­fes­sor and Direc­tor of the Grad­u­ate Pro­gram in Human­i­ties at York Uni­ver­si­ty, Toron­to. His research and pub­li­ca­tions focus on urban imag­i­nar­ies, fash­ion and dig­i­tal cul­tures.

Kat­ri­na Sark is a PhD can­di­date in the Depart­ment of Lan­guages, Lit­er­a­tures, and Cul­tures at McGill Uni­ver­si­ty, spe­cial­iz­ing in cul­tur­al analy­sis and urban cul­tures. She has co-authored Berlin­er Chic: A Loca­tion­al His­to­ry of Berlin Fash­ion (with Susan Ingram) and assist­ed with the research for Wiener Chic. Her pho­tographs have been print­ed in Inquire: Jour­nal of Com­par­a­tive Lit­er­a­ture (2010), Berlin­er Chic (2011), World Film Loca­tions: Berlin (2012), and can be seen on her blog: http://​suites​cul​turelles​.word​press​.com/. She lives in Mon­tre­al.

Ele­na Siemens is Asso­ciate Pro­fes­sor in the Depart­ment of Mod­ern Lan­guages and Cul­tur­al Stud­ies, Uni­ver­si­ty of Alber­ta. Her research inter­ests include visu­al cul­ture, the­o­ret­i­cal and prac­ti­cal pho­tog­ra­phy, per­form­ing arts (espe­cial­ly spaces of per­for­mance), and cul­tur­al and crit­i­cal the­o­ry. She is the author of The­atre in Pass­ing: A Moscow Pho­to-Diary (Intel­lect UK 2011), and edi­tor of two recent col­lec­tions of essays, The Dark Spec­ta­cle: Land­scapes of Dev­as­ta­tion in Film and Pho­tog­ra­phy (Space and Cul­ture: Inter­na­tion­al Jour­nal of Social Spaces, Sum­mer 2014), and Scan­dals of Hor­ror (Imag­i­na­tions: Jour­nal of Cross-Cul­tur­al Images Stud­ies, Issue 1-4, 2013).

Deb­o­rah Walk­er-Mor­ri­son is Senior Lec­tur­er and Head of French at the Uni­ver­si­ty of Auck­land, Aotearoa/New Zealand. Her prin­ci­pal research and teach­ing inter­ests are in French cin­e­ma, Maori Cin­e­ma, and trans­la­tion stud­ies, with a par­tic­u­lar focus on the trans­la­tion of indige­nous Pacif­ic lit­er­a­tures. Of Euro­pean and Maori descent, her kiwi affil­i­a­tions are to the Rākai Pāka and Ngāti Pahuw­era hapu of Ngāti Kāhun­gunu. As well as numer­ous arti­cles and book chap­ters, she has pub­lished French and Amer­i­can Noir: Dark Cross­ings (Pal­grave 2009, with Alis­tair Rolls) and Le style ciné­matographique d'Alain Resnais (Edwin Mellen Press, 2012).

Résumés des arti­cles

Kanak Imag­i­nar­ies: A Sense of Place in the Work of Déwé Görödé | Ray­lene Ram­say

L’étude de l’imaginaire Kanak dans l’œuvre de Déwé Görödé révèle la cen­tral­ité de l’enracinement dans la terre. L’importance du lieu et de la com­mu­nion intense avec la nature n’est pas incom­pat­i­ble avec les voy­ages des ancêtres qui tra­ver­saient le Paci­fique dans tous les sens, ni avec les sen­tiers de la cou­tume et les échanges entre tribus, mais le lieu, qui donne son nom à la tribu, reste pri­mor­dial. Les lieux de Görödé opposent la tribu (à la fois les pays cou­tu­miers et les gens qui l’habitent) à Nouméa la Blanche afin de con­tester la dom­i­na­tion de l’imaginaire nation­al français et sa con­cep­tion de la rela­tion entre Nouméa, la brousse (des colons), et la tribu. Toute­fois l’œuvre de Déwé Görödé artic­ule un ‘Place to Stand’ (lieu d’origine et de résis­tance indigène) et aus­si un être en procès, cri­tique, qui se situe dans un ‘no man’s land’. Enfin, ses lieux d’écriture sont ‘cog­ni­tive­ment dis­so­nants’ et mul­ti­ples : ils con­stituent la marge et le « hin­ter­land » qu’occupe la tribu, mais tout en s’ouvrant aus­si à une occu­pa­tion de la ville et à une cri­tique interne.

A Place to Stand: Land and Water in Māori Film | Deb­o­rah Walk­er-Mor­ri­son

L’identité Māori néo-zélandaise, à l’instar des autres peu­ples indigènes du monde, est inex­tri­ca­ble­ment liée à un sens de l’origine géo­graphique : Tūran­gawae­wae, lit­térale­ment “un endroit pour pos­er ses pieds.” Le lieu spé­ci­fique domine ici la con­cep­tion du ter­ri­toire, mais cela n’exclut pas pour autant les riv­ières, les lacs et l’océan qui ont per­mis la survie du peu­ple Māori depuis son arrivée à Aotearoa, il y a près de mille ans. En rap­prochant les représen­ta­tions de la terre et de l’eau de la dou­ble métaphore des « routes » et des « racines », cet arti­cle exam­ine les ques­tions de la perte, de la con­ser­va­tion, de la récupéra­tion et/ou de la trans­for­ma­tion en lien avec le sen­ti­ment du lieu en tant qu’il occupe une place cen­trale dans le ciné­ma de fic­tion Māori.

Black Wool and Vin­tage Shoes: The Welling­ton Look | Felic­i­ty Per­ry

Il m’a dit que je n’avais pas l’air de venir de Welling­ton.” C’est ce qu’une amie venant d’une petite ville à deux heures de Welling­ton m’a con­fié il y a quelques années alors que nous parta­gions des cock­tails dans un bar local. Cet arti­cle s’interroge: de quel aspect de Welling­ton est-il ques­tion dans une telle affir­ma­tion? En quoi exprime-t-il une idée de Welling­ton comme cen­tre artis­tique et poli­tique de Aotearoa/­Nou­velle-Zélande? On y exam­ine en par­ti­c­uli­er com­ment les habi­tants de Welling­ton définis­sent leur iden­tité urbaine à tra­vers leur style ves­ti­men­taire, à tra­vers l’analyse des façons dont les bou­tiques et fab­ri­cants de Welling­ton créent un style qui se voudrait idio­syn­crasique.

Imag­in­ing Place: An Empir­i­cal Study of How Cul­tur­al Out­siders and Insid­ers Receive Fic­tion­al Rep­re­sen­ta­tions of Place in Caryl Férey’s Utu | Ellen Carter

Cet arti­cle veut offrir la preuve empirique que les lecteurs provenant respec­tive­ment d’une cul­ture extérieure (France), et intérieure (Nou­velle-Zélande), sont influ­encés dif­férem­ment par les élé­ments géo­graphique­ment et cul­turelle­ment situés dans Utu (France 2004; tra­duc­tion anglaise 2011), un roman polici­er de l’auteur français Caryl Férey se déroulant dans la Nou­velle-Zélande d’aujourd’hui. L’étude s’appuie sur une enquête lon­gi­tu­di­nale inter­cul­turelle de la récep­tion au sein du lec­torat. Après lec­ture du roman, les lecteurs cul­turelle­ment externes et internes ont cha­cun changé leur opin­ion quant à l’image véhiculée par Férey, même lorsque ses représen­ta­tions cul­turelles s’avèrent incor­rectes. Qui plus est, aux yeux des lecteurs français, cette influ­ence s’étend au-delà du roman lui-même, et sem­ble se porter sur la Nou­velle-Zélande elle-même, avec ses habi­tants.

NZ@Frankfurt: Imag­in­ing New Zealand’s Guest of Hon­our Pre­sen­ta­tion at the 2012 Frank­furt Book Fair from the Point of View of Lit­er­ary Trans­la­tion | Angela Kölling

Comp­tant plus de 7,000 exposants, une cen­taine de pays par­tic­i­pants, et au-delà de 300,000 vis­i­teurs chaque année, la Foire du Livre de Franc­fort est un vivi­er pour les imag­i­naires poli­tique, économique, et cul­turels, et met ain­si en représen­ta­tion plusieurs lieu locaux et étrangers. La Foire du Livre est fréquem­ment conçue et envis­agée comme un site de com­merce inter­na­tion­al et de trac­ta­tions poli­tiques, mais elle n’a pas été étudiée en tant que site pro­pre à la tra­duc­tion et à l’agentivité du rôle de tra­duc­teur. Cet arti­cle offre une réflex­ion cri­tique sur la métaphore pour le tra­duc­teur, en arguant qu’un déplace­ment, dans les études en lit­téra­ture com­parée de la tra­duc­tion, de la con­cep­tion basique de la métaphore du con­flit à la fric­tion peut engager les études inter­dis­ci­plinaires de la tra­duc­tion dans une voie inex­plorée. Je pro­pose que la métaphore fric­tion­nelle pointe vers un équili­bre entre les détails com­plex­es et une réduc­tion des don­nées qui per­met de décrire l’intensité et les défis de la tra­duc­tion sans retomber dans les pon­cifs ou para­phras­er les con­nais­sances acquis­es.

Film­stadt in the Vorstadt: Loca­tion­al­i­ty in the Film­mak­ing Prac­tice of Mihály/ Michael Kertész/ Cur­tiz | Susan Ingram

Cet arti­cle exam­ine le plus mon­u­men­tal film muet pro­duit dans la république d’Autriche: Sodom und Gom­or­rha (1922). Avec l’exploration du site de tour­nage du film, une enclave de grès et de frich­es à la fron­tière sud de Vienne, on exam­ine com­ment l’histoire passée du site et son incar­na­tion actuelle comme Kur­park révè­lent l’imaginaire urbain du cinéaste et le rôle de la tech­nolo­gie dans sa par­tic­i­pa­tion à la moder­nité. On établit en out­re cer­tain par­al­lèles entre les pre­miers films qu’il a réal­isés sous le nom de Michael Kertész et le suc­cès plus tardif de son film-culte Casablan­ca.

High-Rise Zhiva­go | Ele­na Siemens

Cet arti­cle exam­ine la pro­duc­tion par le Théâtre Tagan­ka de Doc­teur Zhivagode Boris Paster­nak dans une mai­son de la cul­ture en ban­lieue de Moscou. Mar­vin Carl­son a pro­posé que les espaces per­for­mat­ifs joue un rôle à part entière dans le sens glob­al d’un spec­ta­cle. Suite à Carl­son, je pro­pose à mon tour qu’en étant mon­tée dans une ban­lieue de Moscou, la pro­duc­tion Tagan­ka réin­ter­prète rad­i­cale­ment Doc­teur Zhiva­go, le faisant pass­er d’un réc­it indi­vid­u­al­isé à un réc­it col­lec­tif. L’article inter­roge des représen­ta­tions frag­men­taires du Moscou his­torique, des ban­lieues con­stru­ites sous les Sovi­ets, en plus de points de vue sur l’habitabilité sub­ur­baine emprun­tés à des théoriciens cul­turels, des archi­tectes, et des auteurs. Le tout est illus­tré et appuyé par des pho­tos de bâti­ment sub­ur­bains inspirés de Alexan­der Rod­chenko, ain­si que des pho­tos de con­serves Camp­bell et de caiss­es de Coca-Cola ren­dant hom­mage au tra­vail de Andy Warhol. L’article se con­clut avec l’image nos­tal­gique d’une anci­enne mai­son famil­iale, proche de l’esprit orig­i­nal de Boris Paster­nak.

It’s a Kind of Mag­ic: Sit­u­at­ing Nos­tal­gia for Tech­no­log­i­cal Progress and the Occult in Guy Ritchie's Sher­lock Holmes | Markus Reisen­leit­ner

Le suc­cès récent du block­buster de Guy Ritchie revis­i­tant la fig­ure de Sher­lock Holmes s’inscrit dans une lignée récente de films et de réc­its pop­u­laires qui ont reviv­i­fié un imag­i­naire nos­tal­gique du passé lon­donien dans lequel le cen­tre de l’ancien empire bri­tan­nique se trou­ve au croise­ment d’un con­flit manichéen entre un pro­grès sci­en­tifi­co-tech­nologique et les tra­di­tions d’un savoir occulte sup­posé­ment enfouis dans les siè­cles précé­dents mais qui con­tin­ue à s’insinuer au cœur de l’empire à par­tir de ses colonies. En retraçant cer­taines de ces couch­es his­toriques dans les recréa­tions con­tem­po­raines du Lon­dres impér­i­al, cet arti­cle explore les mécan­ismes de pro­duc­tion de la nos­tal­gie dans la cul­ture pop­u­laire en tant qu’ils font le pont entre la mémoire publique et la mémoire his­torique en rat­tachant celles-ci à un imag­i­naire de la géo­gra­phie urbaine qui pour sa part pointe vers la ville glob­ale d’aujourd’hui.

À pro­pos des con­tribu­teurs

Ellen Carter est étu­di­ante au doc­tor­at en co-tutelle avec l’université d’Auckland en Nou­velle-Zélande et l’École Des Hautes-Études en Sci­ences Sociales à Paris. Ses recherch­es por­tent sur les lec­tures, les écri­t­ures, et les tra­duc­tions excen­trées du réc­it polici­er.

Susan Ingram est pro­fesseure asso­ciée au Depart­ment of Human­i­ties de l’université York, à Toron­to. Elle y est affil­iée au Cana­di­an Cen­tre for Ger­man and Euro­pean Stud­ies, et au Research Group on Trans­la­tion and Tran­scul­tur­al Con­tact. Elle est rédac­trice en chef de la série Intel­lect Book’s Urban Chic, et a dirigé le vol­ume sur Berlin de la série World Film Loca­tions.

Angela Kölling est chercheure post­doc­tor­ale au Cen­tre for Euro­pean Research de l’université Gothen­burg en Suède. Elle a reçu son doc­tor­at en lit­téra­ture com­parée de l’université d’Auckland. Elle a fait pub­li­er ses travaux com­parés sur l’essai dans la France et l’Allemagne d’après 1989 sous le titre Writ­ing on the Loose (Wei­dler Berlin) en 2012. Ses recherch­es actuelles por­tent sur le rôle et l’auto-positionnement des tra­duc­teurs lit­téraires dans les sys­tèmes coopérat­ifs inter­cul­turels comme les som­mets cul­turels et les foires du livre. Elle s’intéresse en par­ti­c­uli­er aux métaphores et à leur effets sur l’équilibre entre vie et tra­vail, de même que sur la portée du tra­vail des tra­duc­teurs tant du point vue pro­fes­sion­nel que du point de vie de la recherche académique.

Mar­tin Par­rot est doc­u­men­tariste, étu­di­ant au doc­tor­at en Human­i­ties à York Uni­ver­si­ty, et blogueur/critique cul­turel pour mon​limoilou​.com.

Felic­i­ty Per­ry est auteure d’une thèse de doc­tor­at sur la rela­tion entre l’habillement, l’identité, et les médias. Elle y a exam­iné com­ment les étu­di­ants d’une école sans uni­forme oblig­a­toire en Aotearoa/Nouvelle Zélande utilisent l’habillement et les dis­cours qui s’y attachent afin d’exprimer leur iden­tité. Ses recherch­es s’enracinent dans un intérêt pour la rela­tion entre les médias et les mécan­ismes de la vie quo­ti­di­enne, notam­ment les façons dont les sex­es, la sex­u­al­ité, la race, les class­es sociales et les apparences s’entremêlent dans les inter­ac­tions sociales. Elle habite actuelle­ment à Tel-Aviv, et y reste à l’affut des mul­ti­ples occa­sions d’analyse de l’habillement social qui parsè­ment cette ville.

Ray­lene Ram­say est pro­fesseure de Franςais à l’Université d’Auckland en Nou­velle-Zélande. Elle a pub­lié une his­toire cul­turelle de la Nou­velle-Calé­donie à tra­vers 110  textes lit­téraires traduits en anglais et com­men­tés (Nights of Sto­ry­telling, Uni­ver­si­ty Press of Hawaï) et a co-traduit le pre­mier roman (L’Épave) et les poèmes de l’auteure kanake Déwé Görödé avec Deb­o­rah Walk­er-Mor­ri­son (dans Shar­ing as Cus­tom Pro­vides, Pan­danus Press). Une étude de l’hybridité dans les lit­téra­tures fran­coph­o­nes du Paci­fique paraî­tra chez Liv­er­pool Uni­ver­si­ty Press en 2014. Son tra­vail sur les femmes au pou­voir, French Women in Pol­i­tics: Writ­ing Pow­er, Pater­nal Legit­imiza­tion and Mater­nal Lega­cies (Berghahn Press, Oxford and New York) est paru en 2003. Elle a aus­si pub­lié sur Alain Robbe-Gril­let, Claude Simon, Nathalie Sar­raute, et Mar­guerite Duras (The French New Auto­bi­ogra­phies, et Robbe-Gril­let and Moder­ni­ty: Sci­ence, Sex­u­al­i­ty, and Sub­ver­sion, Uni­ver­si­ty Press of Flori­da).

Markus Reisen­leit­ner est pro­fesseur asso­cié et directeur du pro­gramme gradué au Depart­ment of Human­i­ties de l’Université York à Toron­to. Ses recherch­es et pub­li­ca­tions por­tent sur les imag­i­naires urbains, la mode, et les cul­tures dig­i­tales.

Kat­ri­na Sark est can­di­date au doc­tor­at au Depart­ment of Lan­guages, Lit­er­a­tures, and Cul­tures de l’Université McGill. Elle se spé­cialise en analyse cul­turelle et en études urbaines. Kat­ri­na est la co-auteure de Berlin­er Chic: A Loca­tion­al His­to­ry of Berlin Fash­ion (avec Susan Ingram), et a par­ticipé au tra­vail de recherche pour le livre Wiener Chic. Ses pho­tos ont paru dans Inquire: Jour­nal of Com­par­a­tive Lit­er­a­ture (2010), Berlin­er Chic (2011), World Film Loca­tions: Berlin (2012), ain­si que sur son blog: http://​suites​cul​turelles​.word​press​.com/. Elle habite à Mon­tréal.

Ele­na Siemens est pro­fesseure asso­ciée au Depart­ment of Mod­ern Lan­guages & Cul­tur­al Stud­ies de l’université de l’Alberta. Ses recherch­es por­tent sur les cul­tures visuelles, la théorie et la pra­tique de la pho­togra­phie, la per­for­mance (notam­ment du point de vue spa­tial), et les théories cri­tiques et les études cul­turelles. Elle est l’auteure de The­atre in Pass­ing: A Moscow Pho­to-Diary (Intel­lect UK 2011), et a dirigé deux dossiers en revue: The Dark Spec­ta­cle: Land­scapes of Dev­as­ta­tion in Film and Pho­tog­ra­phy (Space and Cul­ture: Inter­na­tion­al Jour­nal of Social Spaces, Été 2014), et Scan­dals of Hor­ror (Imag­i­na­tions: Jour­nal of Cross-Cul­tur­al Images Stud­ies, 1-4, 2013).

Deb­o­rah Walk­er-Mor­ri­son est Senior Lec­tur­er et direc­trice du pro­grame de français à l’Université d’Auckland en Aotearoa/­Nou­velle-Zélande. Ses prin­ci­paux intérêts de recherche son le ciné­ma français, le ciné­ma Maori, et les études de tra­duc­tion (avec une con­cen­tra­tion par­ti­c­ulière sur la tra­duc­tion des lit­téra­tures indigènes du Paci­fique. D’origine européenne et Maori, ses attach­es à la Nou­velle-Zélande sont Rākai Pāka et le Ngāti Pahuw­era hapu de Ngāti Kāhun­gunu. Out­re de nom­breux arti­cles et chapitres de livre elle a fait pub­li­er French and Amer­i­can Noir: Dark Cross­ings (Pal­grave 2009, avec Alis­tair Rolls) et Le style ciné­matographique d'Alain Resnais (Edwin Mellen Press, 2012).