Petro-landscapes and Political Imagination:
Interview with Steve Rowell (figures 2-8)

Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8
Figure 2: Vopak Terminal Deer Park. The Dutch company Vopak operates a large tank farm, rail, and ship dock terminal here on the south side of Houston’s Ship Channel, for storing and shipping petrochemical products entering and leaving through this, the heart of the nation’s largest petrochemical corridor. Vopak is one of the largest bulk liquid handling companies in the world, with 80 terminals in 32 nations. The terminal is adjacent to the locally owned and operated Intercontinental Terminals Company, which performs a similar function. Steve Rowell / Center for Land Use Interpretation, Texas Oil: Landscape of an Industry, production still, 2008.
Figure 3: Drilling pipe manufacturer in East Texas. Steve Rowell / Center for Land Use Interpretation, Texas Oil: Landscape of an Industry, production still, 2008.
Figure 4: Lots of love at one of the first oil wells in the world. Steve Rowell / Center for Land Use Interpretation, Texas Oil: Landscape of an Industry, production still, 2008.
Figure 5: Marathon Corporate Headquarters, 5555 San Felipe Road, Houston. Marathon, based in Houston, is the fourth-largest U.S.-based integrated oil and gas company, after ExxonMobil, Chevron, and ConocoPhillips. Founded as the Ohio Oil Company in 1887, it grew by acquiring other oil and pipeline companies, and by expanding its operations into West Texas, Alaska, Canada, and elsewhere. It took the Marathon name in 1962, and moved its headquarters to Houston in 1990. Its revenue in 2007 was $65 billion. Steve Rowell / Center for Land Use Interpretation, Texas Oil: Landscape of an Industry, production still, 2008.
Figure 6: Coke Dock, Port Arthur. Located in the port area at the southern end of the city, Port Arthur’s Coke Dock is a major transfer point for petroleum coke produced by the region’s refineries. The black solid material is mostly carbon, and is used in a variety of industrial applications, including steel production. Most refineries produce some amount of the product. Steve Rowell / Center for Land Use Interpretation, Texas Oil: Landscape of an Industry, production still, 2008.
Figure 7: Considered the oil gusher that started the U.S. oil industry as we know it, the historic Spindletop oil well can be best understood these days at this museum in Beaumont, Texas. Steve Rowell / Center for Land Use Interpretation, Texas Oil: Landscape of an Industry, production still, 2008.
Figure 8: Enter the 19th century-era fossil fuel universe at warp speed at one of the dozens of museums in Texas dedicated to inspiring a new generation of oil product consumers. Steve Rowell / Center for Land Use Interpretation, Texas Oil: Landscape of an Industry, production still, 2008.